About bigjac

Just a middle-aged man whose blood pressure and cholesterol were out of wack and needed a tuneup, bad. Then I rekindled my love for riding a bike -- just the simple act of turning the cranks. What happened next is I met a lot of neat people who are as nuts as I am. Ride on.

A Bike Christmas Story

A Christmas present, delayed

Having a sister is like having a best friend you can’t get rid of. You know whatever you do, they’ll still be there.
—Amy Li

Cozy city picture, a bicycle parked at the entrance to the house decorated with Christmas tree branches.I was ten the summer my dad helped me buy my first ten-speed bicycle from Father Allen. I put up $60 of my grass cutting and snow shovelling money, and my dad put up the other half. I would pay him back in instalments over the next six months. Although it was the kind of bike you’d expect a priest to have (dull silver, slightly worn, no baseball cards in the spokes), it was my ticket to the adult world.

I spent that summer and autumn riding as if to put Greg LeMond to shame. My sister Liz, a prisoner of her five-speed and banana seat, never had a chance to keep up. We’d always been stuck with hand-me-downs from our older brothers and sisters, a few of whom had notoriously bad taste in bikes. Now, however, I was able to ride to every corner of town, sometimes even as far as the beach. In those heady days before one acquires a driver’s license, a good bike is a magic carpet.

Just before the Christmas deadline to pay my dad back, we were hit with several snowstorms. This allowed me to shovel enough driveways to pay off my debt. I was now officially a bike owner; it was a feeling unlike any other.

 

It’s important to note that while my mom and dad were fantastic parents, they couldn’t be trusted with the awesome responsibility of buying appropriate Christmas presents. They were too quick to pass off gloves, sneakers, and shirts as “presents.” And while we might say a prayer over the Baby Jesus in the manger on our way to church, He seemed too busy at this time of year to leave presents under the tree. We outsourced our requests for the really good presents to Santa.

For her family of seven kids, my mom developed a system in which she decorated the outside of seven large boxes with different types of wallpaper. We each had our own box that contained six or so presents, and we’d close our eyes and reach in to grab one when it was our turn. This cut down on hours of wrapping and satisfied my dad’s Naval sense of order.

The downside was we opened one present at a time so everyone could “appreciate” each other’s gifts. Neither Liz nor I “appreciated” this system because we went last. After the obligatory “oohs” and “aahs,” each of us held up our present for family review, a process that averaged about five minutes or so. This meant Liz and I had to wait about forty-five minutes between each present, so patience was in short supply—when one of us pulled out a belt or package of underwear, we seethed the entire time.

 

My dad, a master showman, liked to keep a few of Santa’s better presents for the end. On that fateful Christmas morning, he gave me a used portable record player. I was ecstatic—I was finally untethered from the “family stereo” that all of us fought over.

Alas, my elation was short-lived after my dad called my sister to the kitchen. “We have one more gift for you,” he said as he opened the door that led to the garage. There, on the steps, stood a brand new ten-speed Schwinn. I didn’t hear her screams of joy—all I could hear was the sputtering engine of the lawnmower, the endless scraping of the metal snow shovel on concrete. I’d endured far too many hours of indentured servitude for my used bike; that Santa could give Liz this sparkling machine less than a week later was a sign that he was losing his touch. Could Mrs. Claus be putting something in his food?

I slumped onto the floor. My ten-speed chariot had turned into a pumpkin in the time it took my sister to hop on the gleaming leather seat.

“Let’s go for a ride, Rob!” she sang, my dad holding the bike upright as she put her feet on the pedals.

“Too snowy to ride,” I muttered, pushing the record player farther away from me. The symbolism seemed lost on my dad.

I seethed for the rest of the day, then the rest of the week. My dad was not someone to whom we complained about presents (not if we ever wanted to see another, anyway). Santa always seemed to lose interest after Christmas, rarely accepting returns or trade-ins. That left the Baby Jesus, but He wasn’t answering my prayers—I could tell because Liz’s bike had yet to crumble into a pile of rust flakes.

 

After a few weeks of watching me pout, my dad finally pulled me aside. “Everything okay?”

“It’s not fair,” I whined. “I worked so hard for my bike, and it’s not even new. Then Liz gets a brand new bike as soon as I make the final payment. She didn’t have to do anything for it.”

My dad smiled. “She didn’t have to do anything for it because it’s not really for her,” he said, and then left the room.

What did that mean? I didn’t want her bike—it had the girly bar that sloped down to the ground and a flowery white basket on the handlebars. I could turn it in for a new set of action figures, I figured, but she’d been on it every day since Christmas—no way they’d let me take it back now. I eventually got over it, chalking it up to elf error (the naughty and nice list can be cumbersome).

By spring Liz and I were riding all over town together now that she could keep up. Sure, I’d lose her on the steep slopes, but I always let her catch up when we went downhill. Initially, the youngest children in a large family form a bond out of necessity—older siblings can be taxing, and there are only so many locked doors one can hide behind. Sometimes, you need someone else in the foxhole with you.

 

As we grew, Liz and I became true friends. We biked down to swim at the local pool, then put in seven miles to take the free town tennis lessons together. We planned secret parties when my parents went on trips and played a game of “Who can leave less gas in the tank” when we finally got our drivers’ licenses. I relied on her to put names to faces when we were at parties, and she treated my best friends as her personal dating service. We ended up at the same college, and even graduated the same year.

Still, I wasn’t smart enough to figure out what my dad meant until years later. That brand new bike was not a gift for Liz—it was a gift for me. He’d given me the gift of my sister’s company, the ability to stay together rather than drift apart in the face of my ability to travel. He gave me my best friend.

It’s a gift I’ve treasured every day since. 

—Robert F. Walsh

2020 Ride Season Schedule

The 2020 MIT ride schedule has been posted.  Thanks to RN for the help in getting this done. 

As in years past the real schedule is determined at the water tower Saturday morning just before the ride.  Different factors determine the breakfast stop; factors like wind direction, weather concerns, how many riders, who needs to be where at what time and who needs what counselling.  

I scheduled the LAGSAR (LaBroquerie, Giroux, Ste Anne, Richer) rides each Wednesday.  Course we could have called that ride other names like ‘ride til you puke’ or ‘faster is better’ or even ‘heart attack special’.

This post is later in the year than in years past simply because the weather has not cooperated (read fair weather rider) and Covid-19 concerns.  Hopefully we will now have weather turned in the right direction and it looks brighter for the virus concerns as well.

We did have a ride April 25th as the first ride so it has been cold or internal rides since. The 3 Amigos who rode had a great outdoor breakfast.  The picture has us all sitting at separate tables holding our breath so get the group pic, then sitting the required distance apart.

Short story, if there is such a thing.   Called our web page host site IONOS to discuss reducing our cost of this site.  The call centre is in the Philippines and the person i talked to, Alvin, is an avid cyclist.  He understood our needs for a cycling site and was very helpful in sorting out my concerns.  Course we had to talk about our cycling adventures.  Alvin explained that he had a road bike but the busy highways along with not so good road conditions he seldom used his road bike.  He was a pure mountain biker.  When i explained how we always looked for hills in our flat country he said he dreamed of long flat quiet roads that went on forever.  Funny how we look for riding in conditions that are not in our area.  Thanks for your help Alvin.

As always feeling blessed to being able to ride my bike. Looking forward to the rides!

2019 Ride Schedule

As with years past i have built a ride schedule that will appear in our calendar so that everyone will know when and what.

Couple of changes.  I will post 47 rides which is up from last year.  I have added the Wednesday LAGSAR Loop (La Broquerie, Giroux, Ste Anne, Richer) a ride that starts and finishes in La Broquerie on Wednesday nights.  It was started by Merle last year and looking to do more of this year.  Another addition is the Ranger Station ride which we did a couple of times, it will replace the Woodridge ride as there is no breakfast available in Woodridge.  I put in a couple of Pansy-Grunthal rides so that we can enjoy the still new pavement to Pansy.   If you ride all the rides it is about 3,000 km’s of group rides.  This list is not final, that happens at the water tower just before the ride as it often depends on how many riders, which way the wind is blowing and how many strong legs showed up.

  2019 Rides      
date ride km’s time start location
20-Apr-19 Kleefeld 45 9:00 AM water tower
27-Apr-19 Kleefeld 45 9:00 AM water tower
4-May-19 Grunthal 60 9:00 AM water tower
11-May-19 New Bothwell 60 9:00 AM water tower
18-May-19 Grunthal 60 8:00 AM water tower
20-May-19 Richer 80 8:00 AM water tower
22-May-19 Wed LAGSAR Loop 50 6:30 PM La Broquerie, Main Street
25-May-19 Grunthal 60 8:00 AM water tower
29-May-19 Wed LAGSAR Loop 50 6:30 PM La Broquerie, Main Street
1-Jun-19 Ranger Station 90 8:00 AM water tower
5-Jun-19 Wed LAGSAR Loop 50 6:30 PM La Broquerie, Main Street
8-Jun-19 Grunthal 60 8:00 AM water tower
12-Jun-19 Wed LAGSAR Loop 50 6:30 PM La Broquerie, Main Street
15-Jun-19 Richer 80 8:00 AM water tower
19-Jun-19 Wed LAGSAR Loop 50 6:30 PM La Broquerie, Main Street
22-Jun-19 Pansy-Grunthal 85 8:00 AM water tower
26-Jun-19 Wed LAGSAR Loop 50 6:30 PM La Broquerie, Main Street
29-Jun-19 Richer 80 8:00 AM water tower
1-Jul-19 Grunthal 80 8:00 AM water tower
3-Jul-19 Wed LAGSAR Loop 50 6:30 PM La Broquerie, Main Street
6-Jul-19 Ranger Station 90 8:00 AM water tower
10-Jul-19 Wed LAGSAR Loop 50 6:30 PM La Broquerie, Main Street
13-Jul-19 Grunthal 60 8:00 AM water tower
17-Jul-19 Wed LAGSAR Loop 50 6:30 PM La Broquerie, Main Street
20-Jul-19 Pansy-Grunthal 85 8:00 AM water tower
24-Jul-19 Wed LAGSAR Loop 50 6:30 PM La Broquerie, Main Street
27-Jul-19 New Bothwell 60 8:00 AM water tower
31-Jul-19 Wed LAGSAR Loop 50 6:30 PM La Broquerie, Main Street
3-Aug-19 Grunthal 60 8:00 AM water tower
5-Aug-19 Richer 80 8:00 AM water tower
7-Aug-19 Wed LAGSAR Loop 50 6:30 PM La Broquerie, Main Street
10-Aug-19 St Malo 85 8:00 AM water tower
14-Aug-19 Wed LAGSAR Loop 50 6:30 PM La Broquerie, Main Street
17-Aug-19 Ranger Station 90 8:00 AM water tower
21-Aug-19 Wed LAGSAR Loop 50 6:30 PM La Broquerie, Main Street
24-Aug-19 Grunthal 60 8:00 AM water tower
28-Aug-19 Wed LAGSAR Loop 50 6:30 PM La Broquerie, Main Street
31-Aug-19 Pansy-Grunthal 85 8:00 AM water tower
2-Sep-19 Richer 80 8:00 AM water tower
4-Sep-19 Wed LAGSAR Loop 50 6:30 PM La Broquerie, Main Street
7-Sep-19 Pansy-Grunthal 85 9:00 AM water tower
11-Sep-19 Wed LAGSAR Loop 50 6:30 PM La Broquerie, Main Street
14-Sep-19 Grunthal 60 9:00 AM water tower
21-Sep-19 Grunthal 60 9:00 AM water tower
28-Sep-19 Richer 80 9:00 AM water tower
5-Oct-19 Grunthal 60 10:00AM water tower
12-Oct-19 Kleefeld 45 10:00AM water tower
  total approx km’s 2960    
         
  Kleefeld 3    
  Grunthal 11    
  Richer 6    
  New Bothwell 2    
  Pansy-Grunthal 4    
  St Malo 1    
  Wed LAGSAR Loop 17    
  Ranger Station 3    
    47    

 

Out of the Rafters

Last week was exciting as I purchased new road shoes and pedals on a recent road trip.  Getting home I got out the pedal wrench to exchange the pedals.  The last time i changed pedals on my bike was 4 years ago.

In just under 2 hours i had not managed to get any of the pedals off.  First pure strength didn’t break the bond, then a good amount of Liquid Wrench and an overnight soak didn’t do the trick.  Out came the big gun, the propane torch.  At last the pedal began to turn but no crack with the threads finally letting loose accompanied the pedal as it began to loosen from the crank.  Upon closer inspection the now heated threads turned with and the pedal was lopsided.  Alas the cranks will need to be tended to by the experts.  

With our MIT Saturday ride happening i needed to react so i reached into the rafters and pulled down my early 1970’s era Cannondale touring bike i purchased in 2002 for $150.00.

I had ridden her a couple of times in wet weather and borrowed to other people but few km’s had been put on over the last 8 years.  

Once i began riding on Saturday morning to New Bothwell the wonderful feeling of the first ride on this bike hit me.  The down tube shifters worked well but needed getting use to, the comfort of the ride as the 32 mm tires created a great barrier to rough roads. The bike geometry is different, the bike is longer creating more comfort and when drafting i needed to be careful of my front wheel as it is further out front.  One other big difference was the gearing on this bike.  It has a 54×14 as the top gearing and i was running out of gear with the wind.

All went well and just might need to take her out of the rafters more often for a ride.