Trail of the Shining Sea

Along the western shore of Cape Cod lies another rail to trail conversion called the Trail of the Shining Sea. This cycle path runs half the length of the Cape, 17 km. from North Falmouth to Woods Hole. Some serious riders may scoff at rail to trail conversions as mostly flat and straight, with too much pedestrian traffic and too little to challenge a rider. I would generally agree with this assessment. At the same time they can be useful as a part of longer more challenging rides. On arriving on the Cape, without a good idea of which roads would be best to ride, and with limited time to explore, Yvonne and I defaulted to the Trail of the Shining Sea.

The primary reason for coming to Cape Cod was to connect with a friend, Eric Anderson, who was doing research at Woods Hole. I spent 4 months on the beach in PEI as a 10 year old and developed a fascination with diving and deep sea exploration. Woods Hole is a Mecca for oceanographers, and as a kid I was fascinated by both the explorers working out of Woods Hole and the romantic sounding name of this town at the center of deep sea research. The goal of our ride was the Woods Hole Research Institute.

While many of the roads on the Cape have very heavy traffic, the roads leading from our Air BnB had little. A 10 km ride on hilly roads brought us to the trail head. Rather than using the trail we chose to ride the more interesting roads that followed the coast as far as we could. The bike path would be used when road traffic became too heavy. Sea side rides have the advantage of being breezy, something we were grateful for as this area gets both high heat and humidity.

 

 

Cape Cod is “old money”! Large estates and exclusive gated seaside communities line the coast. Many of the access roads to these exclusive retreats for the rich have security guards to keep out the sweating unwashed. Fortunately the rich spend most of their time on their yachts or at the country club or in Boston, New York or Paris or London, so road traffic to and from “the summer cottages” along the coastal roads tends to be fairly light, making for good riding.

An interesting feature of riding along the shore is the tidal marshes and the many creeks that we crossed that feed the marshes. While we didn’t stop to watch birds, other than seeing a bald eagle on an enormous nest along one of the creeks, I imagine that these would be great places to bird watch.

 

Halfway to Woods Hole we took the bike path. It is shaded and flat and Jac would love it as it is perfect for high speed cruising. The speed limit is 15 mph; of course with no speedometer one really has no idea how fast one travels. It did seem however that we might have slightly exceeded what was allowable.

Captain Eric Anderson and his Dog Shark

Our time at Woods Hole involved checking out the experiment being done to study the tail resonance of fish to determine at what resonance they achieve “sweet spot” efficiency moving through the water. Werner would love this sort of thing. The experiment requires analyzing many species of fish, so Eric fishes for sharks, blue fish and a variety of others fish. I had always pictured WHRI as involving the most sophisticated equipment, like the Atlantis research vessel and the Alvin submersible used to discover the Titanic. I discovered that there are big fish and little fish at Woods Hole. Eric, as a little fish, uses his little sail boat to fish for his experiment subjects. This would be Mark’s sort of thing.

Big Fish

In good MIT tradition, a cafe stop was in order at the halfway point. Again, in MIT tradition, the return home, was fast and with wind. Final distance – 60 km.

Little Fish